In this contribution to the debate Lord Bilimoria first responds to criticism of the House of Lords by the Prime Minister by stressing its importance and its ability to gather such a high degree of expertise through its members. He praises Jo Johnson, the Minister of State for Universities and notes the national consensus that international students should not be included in the net migration figures. Furthermore he asks why the UK does not class international students as temporary migrants when other countries such as Canada and Germany do.  He concludes by stressing that not removing international students from the net migration figures is harming the reputation of the UK, its universities and harming its economy.

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In this speech to the House Lord Bilimoria notes the Steel Industry’s past and its modern connections. He notes the importance of steel in relation to the current UK economy as well as the future the industry and the wider manufacturing sector face with regard to Brexit and the negotiations with the EU. He stresses the importance of innovation and R&D to the future of manufacturing and the Steel Industry and notes the impact steel has throughout the UK economy and the need for UK steel to be able to competitive.

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In this speech Lord Bilimoria discusses the UK’s exit from the European Union touching upon issues such as the rights of the three million citizens, their contribution to UK public services such as the NHS, the deadline of March 29th and the complexity of negotiations. He stresses that much of this issue is a human issue and concludes by arguing against the concept that no deal is better than a bad deal noting that the Government had not assessed what no deal means.

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In this second contribution of the day Lord Bilimoria spoke in the debate over amendment 194. He stresses the importance of research to academics and to universities and concludes that anything that supports research is good for the future of research and universities.

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In this question Lord Bilimoria notes the reversal made by the Government to increasing National Insurance contributions for the self-employed is to avoid breaking a manifesto pledge. He states his belief as to why there was opposition to the increase and asks the minister if he agrees that that the main role of the Government is to promote growth of jobs and entrepreneurship. The response from Lord Young is also provided.

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In this contribution to the debates on amendments Lord Bilimoria states his support for the amendment and discusses international students and their importance to the UK as well as the global environment for Higher Education and notes the incentives by other countries to attract international students to them. He argues that it is economic illiteracy not to promote international students. He concludes by stressing the importance and the need for international students.

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In this contribution to a question Lord Bilimoria discusses UK exports and notes the relationship with the EU that the UK’s exports have. He stresses that trade is about more than goods and services but also about the free movement of people. He concludes by stating that exports are crucial to the UK economy.

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In his contribution to the debate on the Budget Statement Lord Bilimoria discusses the proposal to increase national insurance contributions for the self-employed. He also raises questions about issues such as public spending, pensions and tax simplification. He notes that universities were not mentioned in the budget and stresses the contribution of universities and immigrants to the economy. He also notes the issues that Brexit will bring up and adds his criticism that it does not appear to have been addressed by the budget.

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In this contribution to the debate on an amendment to the Higher Education and Research Bill Lord Bilimoria asks the Minister, Viscount Younger of Leckie, a question relating to TEF ratings. He concludes by stressing that the Government should listen again on the issues he asks about.

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