In this contribution during the second reading of the EU Withdrawal Bill Lord Bilimoria notes the effect of the EU referendum on the UK as a whole . He further notes the leaked government analysis of Brexit that says that Britain will be worse off in every scenario. He states that he is a Eurosceptic and highlights aspects of the EU he disagrees with but stresses the benefits the UK has received from EU membership such as trade with it and trade agreements through it. With regard to the Bill, he notes the issue of Ireland and Scotland and argues for the need to give the British people a chance to have their say and that Parliament must have the final word before any deal is passed on to the EU. He concludes by recalling a past conversation which describes Brexit as a train crash in slow motion and states it is not too late “to stop that train crash”.

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In this contribution Lord Bilimoria discusses the EU referendum and the voting results from the various devolved administrations as well as the upcoming Bill before the House. He asks the minister whether the Government has worked in close consultation with the devolved administrations to fulfil their Brexit responsibilities as they had intended. He notes the issue of the Northern Irish border in great detail and also asks how much authority devolved administrations will continue to have over various issues. He also notes the issue of identity among those who wanted to remain or leave the EU.

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Lord Bilimoria’s speech dealt with the economic predictions for the UK in the budget. He notes past attempts to balance the budget as well as positive elements within the current budget such as investment in research and development and the desire to reduce single-use plastics. He argues more needs to be done in areas such as business rates and discusses the issue of Brexit in relation to the budget and that it is completely overshadowed by Brexit and by the potential consequences of leaving the EU.

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In this speech Lord Bilimoria discusses the UK’s trade with the Commonwealth and the wider world as well as its trade with the EU and the effect of Brexit upon UK trade. He also notes the effects of trade agreements between the EU and other countries and the importance that this has to the UK’s wider trade as well as the importance of the EU relative to the other potential trading partners.

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In this speech Lord Bilimoria discusses the UK Defence spending and the state of the combined UK armed forces. He notes the strain the Defence Forces are currently under and the issues that they are currently facing in areas such as funding, equipment and numbers of personnel.

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Britain doesn’t need to ‘take back control’ of immigration. We already have it

July 31st 2017

In an article for the Guardian’s Opinion section Lord Bilimoria writes about immigration and the powers that the UK Government already possesses and discusses the issue of exit checks and the ability to repatriate individuals through an EU directive.

To read the full article please follow the below link:

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/jul/31/britain-take-back-control-immigration-eu-directive-brexit 

In this speech, Lord Bilimoria discusses the report from the European Union Committee on Trade in Goods during and after Brexit. He draws attention towards the need for exit checks at all UK borders, and also stresses the lack of clarity from the government on certain issues. Lord Bilimoria addresses the need for a secure, clear timetable on Brexit negotiations and reiterates the UK’s prowess as a great manufacturing and trading country. He further emphasizes the negative impact of excessive bureaucracy, before finally stressing that public opinion has very much strongly turned against the idea of a Hard Brexit. In conclusion, Lord Bilimoria states that ‘for the benefit of this country, its economy, its business and its citizens, it will make sense not to leave the European Union.’

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In this speech Lord Bilimoria discusses the report by the European Union Committee on UK-EU movement of people. He stresses the need to reintroduce exit checks at UK borders and highlights the issue of international students being included on UK immigration statistics. He also discusses immigration from the EU to the UK and its effect on the country and its economy, especially how a lower level of immigration will affect both skilled and unskilled employment in areas ranging from farming to the NHS. He concludes by stating that according to a recent survey the UK public now favour a deal that resembles Norway’s relationship with the EU which involves the free movement of people. He states that the public opinion has moved against a hard Brexit and that there will be no Brexit. The question posed by Lord Green and Lord Bilimoria’s response is also included below.

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In this speech to the House on the day after the State Opening of Parliament Lord Bilimoria discusses the position of the UK and its economy one year on from the European referendum. He notes that Europe is currently growing faster than the UK and argues that the Prime Minister has not listened. He highlights that International Students are still included on immigration figures and discusses the issues involved in organising trade deals outside of the European Union and the nature of being in such a situation. He criticises past governments over the issue of security and also stresses that public opinion towards Brexit is changing. He expresses his belief that this perhaps shows that Brexit will never happen and suggests that when presented with the realities of leaving the EU and life outside it many may decide that the country should remain a part of the Union instead.

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